a post by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (Quick Thoughts)
@jackyalcine Agree, video tough. If openly licensed can use @internetarchive. Also been thinking about peertube.

I’ve been thinking about video lately too. For very short clips (<2 minutes) I think I would self-host, despite WordPress making it awkward as heck in my experience. Anything longer than that and it’s more of a conundrum.

Could small, “collective” PeerTube instances in the vein of runyourown.social be viable? Needs buy-in from interested parties — or a benefactor — but it’s a way to spread the hosting costs around while offering an alternative to a community. /cc Jacky.

a post by Ton Zijlstra
Which leads me to the question: Is there an easy way to determine the total load size of a webpage (including dependencies / includes like stylesheet images and such)?

I use the browser developer tools’ network tab to help determine the size of a page (usually accessed through the F12 key). Disable the cache before reloading, and most will tell you the combined size of every request which makes up the page, and the amount of data sent over the network. You can also (imperfectly) test the page under different network speed conditions if you want.

For example, Firefox says the post I’m replying to comes in at ~796KB, including all resources (uncached). 299KB of that is your header image, and 38KB is the HTML itself. My entire home page was 1.5MB, until I turned off embedding Tweets and Instagram widgets a moment ago. Now it’s around 492KB (but only text). It just goes to show you how much those external resources can pump the size up!

Page weight and excessive resources is something I’ve tried to stay conscious of when developing my site. Previous iterations have been better at this than what it is now – which is pretty far from “heavy” – but I’m still hoping to trim things back further.

IndieWeb Summit 2019 by Jonathan LaCourJonathan LaCour
I had the great pleasure of spending this weekend in Portland, OR for the 2019 IndieWeb Summit. IWS is my favorite event of the year, as it gives me the opportunity to spend time with so many smart, like-minded, principled people who are interested in using technology to make a positive impact on th...

Thanks for the great write-up!

How did you pull the information for your Following page out of Aperture? I tried looking through the documentaion last night, but couldn’t find anything obvious to point me in the right direction.

Being able to do something similar could help me on a couple of ideas I have floating around my head.

Dear IndieWeb, it may be time to start considering the user, not just the technical spec. by Eli MellenEli Mellen
I’ve been working on a series of walkthrough posts that outline how to IndieWebify a Wordpress site. I presumed the initial setup would be fairly straightforward because a) I have a vague idea of what I’m doing, and b) a suite of plugins already exists. Boy-howdy, was I wrong. (ಥ﹏ಥ) I’ve...

I definitely agree with you, Eli! I was wondering out loud with a half-baked thought just yesterday about how we could help ease newer “generations” into the IndieWeb. Where you are coming from the technical side of things, I was thinking more about the on-boarding process and not expecting people to read swathes of documentation to get started. Having read your post I realise both need to be worked on (in tandem?)

I couldn’t hand over even a working WordPress + IndieWeb installation to my partner and expect her to have a good time using it. I’m trying to bring her round to the idea of moving to her own site, because she’s so frustrated with the social media giants, but the tools just aren’t accessible to her level yet.

What has been built so far in the IndieWeb is amazing. I’ve not been this enthused about having my own website – or what it’s capable of – in years. But I’ve been building on the web for 20+ years; I’m impressed by the technology because of my understanding of it, and I’m the sort of user who can work past the rough edges when I need to — in fact, part of me enjoys the tinkering aspect. On reflection, I might be the worst person to be evaluating how this stuff can be made more usable and accessible for someone who wants it to “just work” as smoothly as the existing options 😅

So I guess the question then becomes – who is best placed to help with this, and how do we bring them on board (if they’re not already)?

a post
That’s exactly what the Indiewebcamps are about. I’m thinking of trying to set one up in Düsseldorf – outside of the regular yearly one organized before Beyond Tellerrand – Nobody said there can only be one bootcamp a year. At these events we’ll get together and focus on solving our Indieweb adaptation issues and gathering feedback on how to make the experience easier for non-tech folk.

I did think while I was writing that there was likely some overlap between what I was thinking about, and the (mostly) offline activities like IndieWebCamp and Homebrew Website Club. However, I’m talking about reaching people who are unlikely to ever attend such a meet-up. To use the IndieWeb Generations definition, I’m thinking about the 3s and maybe 4s in my network. And they might be people I only have a connection with online. I guess where I was going with it was more about seeking a way to engage and coach these particular users into their first steps, rather than relying on them to work through a guide or documentation. (There is still very much a place for more documentation!)

Admittedly it’s still only a half-baked thought, and I’m sure smarter people than me have already thought this through 😃

From Following Posts and Blogrolls (Following Pages) with OPML to Microsub Servers and Readers (BoffoSocko)
Continuing to extend the pathway from easily following websites to having them in your social reader.

Thanks for consolidating this in one place, Chris. I caught snippets of the series and conversation between you and Ton in my Reader, but didn’t go back to search out everything. Now I have a concise place to go to when I have some time to read everything 😃

For my own part, my Links page is powered by the old WordPress Links Manager. I had no idea that had an OPML import function – that would have saved me hours of manual entry! I also didn’t know it could generate an OPML file for import elsewhere. “Today I Learned.”

In the last couple of weeks I’ve thought about creating a special page on my site to aggregate all of my Bookmark-type posts into one place. Similarly, I could create a custom “Kind” for Following, and aggregate those in a single place. Neither option would have their own automatic OPML file, but using a Kind does allow for a specific Feed for each type. It would allow for the full range of post meta to be added to each type too. The Post Kinds plug-in generates archives for each Kind, but I’m thinking a custom page would allow me to play with the presentation a bit more.

It’s something for me to experiment with at the least!