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That’s exactly what the Indiewebcamps are about. I’m thinking of trying to set one up in Düsseldorf – outside of the regular yearly one organized before Beyond Tellerrand – Nobody said there can only be one bootcamp a year. At these events we’ll get together and focus on solving our Indieweb adaptation issues and gathering feedback on how to make the experience easier for non-tech folk.

I did think while I was writing that there was likely some overlap between what I was thinking about, and the (mostly) offline activities like IndieWebCamp and Homebrew Website Club. However, I’m talking about reaching people who are unlikely to ever attend such a meet-up. To use the IndieWeb Generations definition, I’m thinking about the 3s and maybe 4s in my network. And they might be people I only have a connection with online. I guess where I was going with it was more about seeking a way to engage and coach these particular users into their first steps, rather than relying on them to work through a guide or documentation. (There is still very much a place for more documentation!)

Admittedly it’s still only a half-baked thought, and I’m sure smarter people than me have already thought this through 😃

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  1. > I’m talking about reaching people who are unlikely to ever attend such a meet-up. To use the IndieWeb Generations definition, I’m thinking about the 3s and maybe 4s in my network.
    Thanks for the pointer to IndieWeb Generations (https://indieweb.org/generations#IndieWeb_Generations). Had missed that page completely until now.
    Going to have to analyse that page first and think about how we can resolve your original point.
    > seeking a way to engage and coach these particular users into their first steps, rather than relying on them to work through a guide or documentation.
    Most regular people don’t want to have a site for the sake of it, why do most people enjoy using silos (Facebook especially) so much?
    What are their main activities there? Actions like safely sharing pictures of their children with their family etc. Silos simply work and are popular so it’s easy to find friends and family to connect to. They are available everywhere, are free (if you take away the price of given away your privacy) and require zero technical knowledge. ( Wondering if somebody studies why Facebook is so popular?)
    How can we enable them to achieve those actions using IndieWeb solutions, with the same ease as when they stay within the silos?
    Projects like Known and micro.blog share those ambitions. So I’ll try to contribute to those projects in order to make them “more mainstream” as-in “easier to use”. Creating documentation and training will of course help too.

    via social.johanbove.info

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